What I'm reading now: 13 June 21

So... more classic detective fiction. Specifically, Jacques Futrelle and R. Austin Freeman.

I finally read the last few Thinking Machine stories by Jacques Futrelle. I enjoyed them, although none are quite as good as "The Problem of Cell 13" - the first Thinking Machine story I read, and still my favourite. However, there is one lovely story (I don't remember the title, sorry), which I shall now spoil for you by telling you that, after The Thinking Machine has deduced the existence of a specific couple from the barest of clues, drawn them to his chambers, and demonstrated that all his deductions are completely accurate as well as brilliant, and dismissed them to sin no more, so to speak... his Watson (intrepid reporter Hutchinson Hatch) asks who the couple is - and the Thinking Machine has no idea of their identity.

I have been reading more Dr. Thorndyke mysteries. Having read all the short stories I can find, I'm now delving into Dr. Thorndyke novellas. Dr. Thorndyke is the forerunner of the forensic scientist. He doesn't detect, as such. What he does is a proto- scene-of-the-crime analysis, and it's quite fascinating. He (and his brilliant but self-effacing assistant, Polton) has developed a small vaccuum device to collect dust for microscopic analysis. Fiber comparisons, fingerprints, decomposition rates, insect traces - it sounds familiar to the forensic-science aficionados, although some of the things that happen to a crime scene before he gets there would make those same aficionados cringe. Thorndyke even looks states that he expects that one day science will be able to positively identify a man by a single drop of his blood - which is almost routinely done today.

As to the novellas: the stories ("The Eye of Osiris" and "The Mystery of Angelina Frood", from Dr. Thorndyke's Crime File) are told from the point of view of a third party, different in each story, who is the agent of bringing the mystery to Thorndyke, his companion Jervis, and assistant Polton. Because there's a little more length to expand the stories in a novella, as opposed to a short story, a side plot (a romance, of course) is slid into the mix, along with a little extra ornate prose. I could do without both, but they're only a mild annoyance, and I will admit that, in "Angelina Frood," I had suspicions of the right character, but for all the wrong reasons. Cleverly done, Mr. Freeman; I will continue hunting up more of your work.