What I'm Reading Now: 13 June 03

In fiction, I continue to read classic detective literature online. This past week or so, it's been more Dr. Thorndyke mysteries, and The Old Man in the Corner by Baroness Orczy. The Baroness is also responsible for the Scarlet Pimpernel books, but I prefer the Old Man - a nameless armchair detective who attends the sensational trials of the moment, and then sets out the solution to Polly Burton, a journalist and his captive audience at the cafe where she eats lunch. The stories are entertaining and twisty, although I find that they rely on the same twist too often. Still, an entertaining read, and you can't beat the availability and the price.

In non-fiction, there have been two: Anne Lamott's Plan B: Further Thoughts on Faith and Eunice Adorno's Las mujeres flores.
Ms. Lamott first: as with other of her books that I've read, this is a series of essays, in this case linked to faith, especially faith when the government seems hopelessly set on a dangerous track. There are some lovely, honest, blunt meditations on being a parent, on forgiveness, on teaching Sunday School, and in all of them she throws tiny bridges of hope across the gap between what we want to be and what we are now, making it possible for me to believe that I can reach that ideal, if only for a second or two at a time. (I recommend "sincere meditations" for those moments where you believe it's impossible to ever live up to those ideals.)
Las mujeres flores is a book my supervisor recommended to me. It's a photo essay about Mennonite women in Mexico: the flower women, to translate the title. The book has a brief introduction, in Spanish and English, and then is simply a series of photographs: family photographs belonging to the women, as well as Adorno's own images of their lives and surroundings. My supervisor found the pictures very exotic - I, on the other hand, thought them very familiar. I could have gone to school with some of these women, seen them on the street, helped them and their children in the library, even visited some of their kitchens. The way of life depicted here has been transplanted almost intact to some areas of southern Manitoba. It's interesting to see what Adorno has captured as significant. My only complaint is that the only information available about the pictures themselves is a title (if any- most are untitled), the location, and the year. In many cases, I find the pictures self-explanatory, but there are a few where I wonder if my suppositions about what is shown is correct.