What I'm Reading Now

 

Welcome to What I'm Reading Now, which I hope will become a regular feature here on reinland.ca. I've been an inveterate reader since age six, with a couple of pauses along the way for life events, and I'm a librarian (and have been for a while). I enjoy recommending books to people, primarily in the genre that I read most, which is mystery/thriller. This is not to say I don't read other kinds of books—I do, just not as regularly.

Enough introduction-- on to the books.

Someone will be with you shortly: notes from a perfectly imperfect life by Lisa Kogan (HarperCollins, 2010).

Apparently Lisa Kogan writes a column for O: the Oprah magazine. I've never read it.

I may start now.

This was hilarious. I usually don't read sections aloud to my long-suffering husband. In this case, not only could I not keep from reading lines to him, I couldn't stop laughing while I was doing so. I've always thought laughing at your own jokes to be a little gauche, but that didn't stop me. The best part was that he was laughing, too, and continued chuckling at intervals for half an hour afterward. (See chapter 11, “The Hours”, especially for the bit about Mrs. Weinstein, Julia's stuffed platypus. (Okay, I have to quote it: “... though I do spend an ungodly amount of time wondering why my daughter is not on a first-name basis with her stuffed platypus...”))

Anyway, Kogan gently makes fun of herself, rather than the people around her, which is something of a lost art. She can be funny, nostalgic, wry, wise, and she knows her way around a sentence. I found her book very hard to put down; so much so that I was holding up an LED puck light as a booklight in bed, and putting it down to turn the pages, to finish that one last essay.

Read it; I think you'll like it.

 

Love you to death and One fine day you're gonna die,both by Gail Bowen (Raven Publishers, 2010).

I finished both of these in an afternoon.

Okay, well, first of all, I read quickly. Secondly, they're both part of the publishers' new series called Rapid Reads. They're paperback books, 128 pages each. (Truth be told, I finished both of them inside an hour). They are also extremely good.

I've been reading Gail Bowen's mysteries for years now. She's a Canadian writer, and her mysteries feature Joanne Kilbourn, who lives in Regina and seems to have murder follow her around. Bowen's characters are interesting and human, and her plots are brilliantly twisty. That being said, Joanne Kilbourn doesn't show up in either of these books. Instead, they focus on Charlie D, a radio DJ who attracts some very odd listeners. Charlie D was a main character in Bowen's seventh mystery, Burying Ariel. I'd like to say that I thought then that I'd like to see more of Charlie D, but that may not be true; I am, however, quite pleased to see him again.

Each book takes place during the span of a single show, where Charlie D is dragged into trying to prevent a murder—a tall order, considering that he's an ordinary radio DJ, not a psychologist or hostage negotiator. Whether or not he can pull it off, and how, makes for excellent reading.

If you like these, try Bowen's other mysteries. She deserves to be more widely read.

 

Enjoy!

Linda

Comments

Thanks so much, Linda, for introducing us to books, whether they strike our fancy or not.  As you know, I also love mysteries.  So now I'll be able to ask more intelligently for books when I run out of the ones I'm reading now or ones I mean to read from my own library.

Did you know that Vinyl Cafe is now running on Sat mornings from 9-10 on CBC-FM?  I've been caught off guard when waiting for it at the usual time.  Today's Dave story was hilarious.  You can catch it on Tues nights on 990 at 11-12 p.m. or of course, download the podcast.